Part II of Wolverette’s 3rd Print Issue: “Paris”

Posted: April 13, 2010 in Past issues

PARIS
By
EMILY C. BERENS
INT. – DAY – RUTHIE’S APARTMENT
The room is cheaply decorated and has modest, run down
furniture. SARAH, 20ish, sits on the couch sleeping while a
sleeping SKYLAR sits next to her in a cradle.
RUTHIE, early 20s, enters carrying a bag of groceries. She’s
dressed in nurses’ scrubs.
RUTHIE
Sarah?
SARAH
What? Oh, hi. Sorry. Looks like we
both fell asleep.
RUTHIE
(with a laugh)
Don’t worry about it. Thanks so
much for helping me out.
SARAH
What are friends for, or something
like that, right?
RUTHIE
Was she any trouble?
SARAH
No, not at all. How was work?
RUTHIE
Fine. I’ll let you get going.
SARAH
Alright, and I’ll let you get some
sleep. I think we’re going to drink
some beers out in my cousin’s field
tonight. Want to come?
RUTHIE
Yeah, I’ll give my mom a call. She
can watch the baby.
SARAH
(joking)
Glad to see that I’m such a good
influence on Skylar’s mom.
RUTHIE
Get outta here. See you tonight.
Sarah and Ruthie do their secret handshake as Sarah grabs
her keys and heads out the door. They are childhood friends.
EXT. – DAY – HILL
Sarah and BETH, another girl in her early 20s sit on the
hill overlooking some fields. It’s the heat of the day and
they are enjoying pops and cigarettes.
SARAH
I watched the baby today.
BETH
Yeah? Which one?
SARAH
(with a laugh)
Ruthie’s.
BETH
Right, right. How’s she holding up?
SARAH
She seems fine. Tired. I guess
that’s what happens when you have a
baby and go to nursing school and
all of that.
BETH
Yeah. That’s lame. Did you hear
Hilary is pregnant now, too?
SARAH
Christ!
BETH
I know. I’m getting out of here
before I get pregnant just standing
around.
SARAH
Good idea.
BETH
Think you’ll ever leave?
SARAH
Yeah.
Beat.
SARAH (CONT’D)
Think you’ll ever come back?
Beat.
BETH
Yeah.
Beat.
BETH (CONT’D)
What time does Sam get off?
SARAH
Don’t know.
INT. – DAY – PARIS FIREWORKS SUPERSTORE
A few redneck-looking men and teenagers wander around the
store. There is an obnoxious country song playing on the
overhead radio, and SAM, 20, sits behind a counter. The door
swings open bringing in natural light, Sarah, and Beth.
Amused by their surroundings, they saunter up to the counter
to a grinning Sam.
SAM
Welcome to Paris Fireworks
Superstore, ladies. How can I help
you?
BETH
What time do you get off?
SAM
We are having a special today. Six
Black Cats for the price of one!
SARAH
We know you’re not busy tonight.
We’re drinking over at my cousins.
Come over.
SAM
State law prohibits setting
fireworks off in Ohio. You’ll have
to take them over state lines.
BETH
Cool, dude.
SAM
I get off at eight.
SARAH
Thank you.
SAM
See you then.
BETH
Bye, Sam.
EXT. – NIGHT – FIELD
Sarah, Beth, and Ruthie sit in lawn chairs enjoying some
beers. Near them stand a few more boys their age, also
drinking beer.
About ten yards off, Sam fiddles with some fireworks.
SAM
Alright. Get ready!

Sam lights the fuse, and runs to where the others stand,
cracks his own beer. The rocket launches, and they stand,
looking to the sky and watch as it explodes and lights up
their faces light up.
SARAH
Do you think the guy who named this
town Paris had a sense of humor?
Beth and Sarah share a glance, and then look back up to the
sky to watch another explosion.
BETH
Yeah.
They watch the explosions in the sky in silence and awe.
FADE OUT.

Wolverette: What does play writing mean to you?

Emily: More than anything, I like telling stories. I don’t necessarily use it to express myself, per se, but I do use it to explore different themes.

Wolverette: How does the sole act of writing it down feel?

Emily: I always have ideas and stories and characters in my head. Writing takes a concept or story and materializes it for me.

Wolverette: Do you find writing plays a good way of expressing what you have to tell the world? if yes/no, why?

Emily: I don’t find writing particularly expressive of my own voice, but I really enjoy exploring other kinds of people and what they deal with. A fair amount of what I write is at least a teeny bit autobiographical. I have at least some sort of common thread with most of my characters. I’ve never really written on issues that I have no experience with, but I’d like to try to see how I’d be able to relate to those characters.
I think that writers in general have to understand the human experience to be successful at what they do. At some level, everyone can find something relatable to everyone else, so even if the situation is completely different than something in our own lives, I feel like there is some way that a good writer could honestly and justly write those stories.

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